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Catholic Dads Must Read Scripture!

July 28, AD2014 9 Comments

Jesus was a master teacher, the greatest teacher who has ever lived, for He is the Only Son of God. There can be no human teacher who can approach the wisdom of Jesus Christ.

One might say with certainty that the Bible is the greatest textbook ever written, for in it is absolute Truth, written throughout the minds and hands of men who were inspired by an actual encounter with God Himself. The Bible is the Source of the Wisdom of God, documented and preserved by the Catholic Church. The New Testament has its source in the actual teaching of Jesus during the Incarnation, preserved orally by Christ’s hand-picked Apostles and eventually written down with the guidance of the Holy Spirit (for more on this, read from the Catechism of the Catholic Church sections 101-137).

Some men resist reading the Scriptures for they find them old, tired, boring or something that is meant for women and children. Some men believe that if they have read Scripture once, or heard it in Mass over a lifetime, that they have sufficient knowledge. Some men make excuses about not having enough time or procrastinating: “I’ll read the Bible someday when I’m older”.

This is a mistake that many men make. Including this one.

Men, wake up! Scripture is the actual Word of God, spoken for all. But spoken explicitly for you. It is in Scripture that men meet Jesus in a real way, for when you pick up Scripture, you are meeting Jesus in a real and substantial way….Jesus sits beside you, no matter where you are, each time you pick up His Word and read.

A note to dads from a dad who has so often failed: you can never live up to your most important responsibility to your children, which is to pass along a fervent faith in Jesus Christ, unless you know Jesus Christ. You can not know Jesus Christ without knowing Jesus Christ as He speaks in the Bible.

Men, if you fail to read and draw closer to Jesus Christ in the Bible, you will fail in most important fatherly duty to pass along the faith to your children. For you can not pass along what you don’t know.

Begin today and draw closer to Our Lord and King Jesus Christ.

For more on the importance of drawing closer to Christ in Scripture please read this.

Filed in: Family, Parenting

About the Author:

Matthew James Christoff is a Catholic convert. He is the founder of The New Emangelization Project (NewEmangelization.com) which is committed to confront the Catholic "man-crisis" and to develop new ardor, methods and expressions for the re-evangelization of Catholic men. Matthew is also a co-founder of CatholicManNight (CatholicManNight.com), a parish-based men's evangelization effort that has drawn thousands of Catholic men into Eucharistic Adoration, Confession, fellowship and lively discussion. Matthew lives in Minnesota with his beautiful bride (and childhood sweetheart); they have 4 adult children, 3 "in-law" children and two grandchildren.

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  • james

    ” Men, if you fail to read and draw closer to Jesus Christ in the Bible, you will fail in most important fatherly duty to pass along the faith to your children. ”
    Matt, faith is a gift, what you pass on to your children is tradition. And if they find another one
    on their own, don’t sweat it, the Holy Spirit moves amongst all “.. men ( woman ) of goodwill “..

    • http://tonylayne.blogspot.com/ Anthony S. Layne

      Hey, james! You’re committing a fallacy of equivocation here. If Matthew had said “… fatherly duty to pass along faith …” I might have agreed with your objection. But what he said was “… fatherly duty to pass along THE faith …”. This indicates something specific — in context, “faith” as a particular set of beliefs, a tradition if you will. In this sense, “faith” doesn’t have to be distinguished from “tradition”. It’s a common usage, not peculiar to Catholics alone.

      As to whether Matt should sweat it if the children find another one on their own … ah, that’s another story, one too long for a combox thread. Maybe that’ll be my next topic …. :)

    • james

      Yes, Anthony, guilty of splitting hairs as I sometimes do. Always waiting for a
      friendly pounce – bring it on :)

  • David Peters

    Matthew thanks for this great article. I love the way you point us in the right direction! You are so right about needing God’s Word.

    • Emmanuel M.H.

      Without It one will wilt! I say it from experience. One becomes thirsty and there is not enough water that will satisfy. Take in the WORD OF GOD.!

  • Catholic pilgrim

    St. Jerome: “ignorance of Sacred Scripture is ignorance of Christ.” Catholics (out of all Christians) are the ones who have the greatest obligation to know the Bible the best.

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  • Bill S

    A religion is only as good as its ability to make people believe in it. Christianity is very good at making people believe in it. It promises an eternal reward for those who believe in it. It threatens death and even eternal punishment to those who refuse to believe in it. 
    This article encourages men to read and believe the Bible and to pass this knowledge onto their children. That is exactly what religion needs to grow and prosper. The whole goal of the Bible and the Catholic Church is to gain and keep believers. That is why faith is held in such high esteem and presented as a prerequisite for salvation. 
    I’m not saying that the Catholic Church and the Bible haven’t been instrumental in making this world a better place to live. Nonetheless, Christianity and other religions are spread and sustained by convincing people of the importance of faith. I know that faith gives meaning and purpose to life and I have seen the positive effect it can have on people. But I believe that it is the hope that comes from believing that inspires people to live more fulfilling lives and not the truth of what is actually believed. 

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