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Author Archive: Donald R. McClarey

Cradle Catholic. Active in the pro-life movement since 1973. Father of three and happily married for 30 years. Small town lawyer. President of the board of directors of the local crisis pregnancy center. Easily amused as demonstrated by the fact that he blogs for amusement.

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Satan and Blogging

October 7, AD2014 11 Comments
Satan and Blogging

I have always been fairly indifferent to the hits my blog posts receive, possibly since blogging makes up 0.00000 % of my  income.  However, over the years I have noticed that certain topics usually do draw massive amounts of hits.  Here are the top ten: 1.   Anything with Satan in the title. 2.   Sarah Palin-A sure […]

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Jefferson Davis and Pio Nono

September 9, AD2014 15 Comments
Jefferson Davis and Pio Nono

Jefferson Davis was always a friend to Catholics.  In his youth as a boy he studied at the Saint Thomas School at the Saint Rose Dominican Priory in Washington County Kentucky.  While there, Davis, the only Protestant student, expressed a desire to convert.  One of the priests there advised the boy to wait until he […]

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Father Ireland and the Fifth Minnesota

August 12, AD2014 1 Comment
Father Ireland and the Fifth Minnesota

One of the titans of the Catholic Church of the Nineteenth Century in the United States was Archbishop John Ireland, the first Archbishop of Saint Paul, Minnesota. Future blog posts will cover his career as Archbishop. This blog post is focused on his service during the Civil War. Ordained a priest only a year, Father John Ireland, […]

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General Longstreet, Catholic Convert, Husband of “The Fighting Lady”

June 17, AD2014 2 Comments
General Longstreet, Catholic Convert, Husband of “The Fighting Lady”

Hattip to Pat McNamara of Patheos for his post on General Longstreet’s conversion which inspired this post. General Lee referred to James “Pete” Longstreet as his “Old War Horse”. One of the more talented corp commanders of the Confederacy, Longstreet’s memory was long blackened in the South after the War due to Longstreet becoming a Republican […]

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The Priest of the Confederate Prison in Andersonville

May 20, AD2014 1 Comment
The Priest of the Confederate Prison in Andersonville

I normally take great pride in being an American, but there are passages in our history which all Americans should be ashamed of.  During our Civil War in many prison camps, both North and South, prisoners of war (POWs) were treated wretchedly with inadequate shelter, clothing and food.  The worst by far was Andersonville. The […]

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Father Walter Ciszek: With God in Russia

April 23, AD2014 7 Comments
Father Walter Ciszek: With God in Russia

Perhaps there are braver men than Walter Ciszek, but they don\’t come readily to mind. Hard enough to be brave for a short period when the adrenaline is flowing. Ciszek was brave under often horrendous circumstances for almost a quarter of a century. Born in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania on November 4, 1904, the son of Polish immigrants, […]

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Blessed John Paul II: First Pope of the Catholic Resurgence

March 25, AD2014 10 Comments
Blessed John Paul II:  First Pope of the Catholic Resurgence

Sometimes a great historical figure is not as recognized as such during his lifetime.  Other historical figures are recognized as monumentally important even while they live.  John Paul II, who will be canonized on April 27, 2014, was definitely in the latter category.  He was the most important Pope of the last century, and the […]

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Lenten Courage: Blessed Clemens von Galen, The Lion of Munster

February 25, AD2014 6 Comments
Lenten Courage: Blessed Clemens von Galen, The Lion of Munster

\”Neither praise nor threats will distance me from God.\” – Blessed Clemens von Galen (1878-1946) . The Nazis hated and feared Clemens August Graf von Galen in life and no doubt they still hate and fear him, at least those now enjoying the amenities of some of the less fashionable pits of Hell.  Going into Lent, […]

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Feast Day of the Dumb Ox

January 29, AD2014 2 Comments
Feast Day of the Dumb Ox

\”You call him Dumb Ox?  This Dumb Ox will fill all the world with his bellowing.\” -Saint Albert the Great, responding to jibes from some of the other students he was instructing aimed at a young Thomas Aquinas Yesterday, January 28th, was the feast day of Saint Thomas Aquinas, who was granted three gifts from […]

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A New Year and A New Hope

December 31, AD2013 6 Comments
A New Year and A New Hope

I do not regret this year coming to a close. For me, 2013 will always be the year when my beloved son, Lawrence C. McClarey, died at the age of 21 of an epileptic seizure during the middle of the night. His death was completely unexpected. Other than what we thought were mild seizures, he had them from […]

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The Devil You Say?

December 3, AD2013 3 Comments
The Devil You Say?

Considering all the extravagant evil in the world, I have always found it remarkable that so many people do not believe in the existence of Satan and his fallen angels. Pope Leo XIII foresaw this, which is why he gave us the prayer to Saint Michael. In 1942 CS Lewis in The Screwtape Letters wrote what may […]

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Remember, Remember

November 5, AD2013 4 Comments
Remember, Remember

The idiotic anti-Catholic celebration of Guy Fawkes Day, observed each November fifth, was effectively ended in America during the Revolution, in large part due to George Washington.  Here is his order on November 5, 1775: As the Commander in Chief has been apprized of a design form\’d for the observance of that ridiculous and childish custom […]

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Catholics in the American Revolution

October 8, AD2013 2 Comments
Catholics in the American Revolution

Nor, perchance did the fact which We now recall take place without some design of divine Providence. Precisely at the epoch when the American colonies, having, with Catholic aid, achieved liberty and independence, coalesced into a constitutional Republic the ecclesiastical hierarchy was happily established amongst you; and at the very time when the popular suffrage […]

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The Pope, The Clown, and The Cross

September 10, AD2013 7 Comments
The Pope, The Clown, and The Cross

In 1957 comedian Red Skelton was on top of the world. His weekly comedy show on CBS was doing well. He had  curtailed the drinking which had almost derailed his career. Not too shabby for a man who had started out as a circus and rodeo clown and who was now often called the clown prince of American […]

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Honest Abe and Dagger John

August 13, AD2013 3 Comments
Honest Abe and Dagger John

Archbishop John Hughes (1797-1864) of New York, was a titan within the Catholic Church in America in the nineteenth century. Overseeing with skill the explosive growth of the Church in New York, and helping lead generations of Catholic immigrants out of poverty, he also found time to take part in the public affairs of his day, […]

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Meek, Pious and Brave as a Lion

July 16, AD2013 2 Comments
Meek, Pious and Brave as a Lion

Peter Paul Cooney was born in County Roscommin, Ireland in 1822.  He went with his family to America at the age of 5.  Raised on a farm in Monroe, Michigan.  Studying at Notre Dame it was perhaps fated that he would become a Holy Cross priest, although he wasn\’t ordained until the age of 37.  […]

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Pio Nono, the Washington Monument and the Purloined Block of Marble

June 18, AD2013 4 Comments
Pio Nono, the Washington Monument and the Purloined Block of Marble

Well it took long enough.  George Washington had been dead for more than three decades before a society was founded to build a monument to his honor in the city which bore his name. In 1832, the centenary of the birth of Washington, the Washington National Monument Society was founded. The Society began raising funds […]

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